How to Create a Perfect Blog Post in 6 Steps (Infographic)

Just for Fun, Updates, Web Design

The demands on the modern blogger are several – kids, regular jobs, social lives, sleeping (what’s that?) – therefore it’s easy to miss crucial details when trying to write and publish new blog posts on a consistent basis.

That’s why Function and Paper Leaf Design created the ultra-handy, functional and free Blogger’s Circle of Life Infographic: How to Create a Perfect Blog Post in 6 Steps.

The Blogger’s Circle of Life is an easy reference guide that takes bloggers from the very first bursts of inspiration for their blog post right through keyword research, writing headlines, organizing your subheadings and creating compelling calls to action for your readers.

Download the Blogger’s Circle of Life and save it as your wallpaper and you’ll never worry again about what your blog posts are missing.

Choose your free desktop wallpaper from these sizes: 1280px1440px1680px,1920px2560px and the big guy, 2880px.

How to Create a Perfect Blog Post in 6 Steps (Infographic)

Info, Just for Fun, Updates, Web Design

The demands on the modern blogger are several – kids, regular jobs, social lives, sleeping (what’s that?) – therefore it’s easy to miss crucial details when trying to write and publish new blog posts on a consistent basis.

That’s why Function and Paper Leaf Design created the ultra-handy, functional and free Blogger’s Circle of Life Infographic: How to Create a Perfect Blog Post in 6 Steps.

The Blogger’s Circle of Life is an easy reference guide that takes bloggers from the very first bursts of inspiration for their blog post right through keyword research, writing headlines, organizing your subheadings and creating compelling calls to action for your readers.

Download the Blogger’s Circle of Life and save it as your wallpaper and you’ll never worry again about what your blog posts are missing.

Choose your free desktop wallpaper from these sizes: 1280px1440px1680px,1920px2560px and the big guy, 2880px.

Breaking Stereotypes

Updates

stereotype

A person or thing that conforms to a widely held but oversimplified image of the class or type to which they belong

In social psychology, a stereotype is a thought that can be adopted about specific types of individuals or certain ways of doing things. These thoughts or beliefs may or may not accurately reflect reality.  However, this is only a fundamental psychological definition of a stereotype.

Stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination are understood as related but different concepts. Stereotypes reflect expectations and beliefs about the characteristics of members of groups perceived as different from one’s own, prejudice represents the emotional response, and discrimination refers to actions.

Possible judgments of stereotypes  are:

  • Justification of ill-founded prejudices or ignorance
  • Unwillingness to rethink one’s attitudes and behavior towards stereotyped groups
  • Preventing some people of stereotyped groups from entering or succeeding in activities or fields

 

If you couldn’t understand what was being said above, allow me to explain. Stereotype basically means that you have branded tha a particular person/ group of people with a dumb concept and have chosen to ( mostly) hate them, even though the person whome you are “branding” may actually be different from the others that you have faced

 

For Example

All men are dogs

Most women are sluts searching for guys to hog their car, money and eventually destroy their lives for their pleasure

and more insulting/ abusive/ embarassing/ harassing etc. comments of similar nature

 

Thats not nice, is it ?? I didnt think so

A social campaign was started by TrulyMadly.com (a matrimonial site) to break stereotypes. And they have  done a wonderful job

From the website

The world is a funny place. We live to be distinctive and strive to fit in at the same time, adding fuel to the fire of collective stereotypes while moving forward. But we at Truly Madly aren’t okay with the status quo.We like to see every individual through a different lens instead of bucketing them in categories. We like meeting fun people in this funny world and figuring out what makes them stand out.
We like going against the rules.We like breaking stereotypes.

 

Checkout #BreakingStereotypes by TrulyMadly.com

What Makes the Best Logos So Good

Logos, Updates, Web Design
Expert Explains What Makes the Best Logos So Good
Image credit: starbucks.com

“A company’s logo is its shorthand, a visual cue that tells a story of the brand’s culture, behavior, and values,” said Su Mathews Hale, a senior partner at the New York brand-strategy and design firm Lippincott. Because a logo may only have a second to tell this story, creating one “can sometimes be the most difficult aspect of branding,” she said.

We had her guide us through some of her favorite projects she’s worked on, as well as some of the corporate logos she most admires.

Wal-Mart Stores, Inc

In 2005, Wal-Mart recruited Lippincott to reimagine its brand. It wanted to shed its image as a big corporate outlet for cheap products and become seen as a place where people could wisely save money and buy premium groceries. Wal-Mart debuted its new logo in 2008.

Mathews and her team felt that the old logo’s all-caps, dark blue letters screamed “corporation” and had become inextricably linked to the popular view among critics who saw Wal-Mart as a malevolent giant crushing small businesses across the country. They deemed the star serving as a hyphen generic and forgettable. They also believed that businesses with hyphenated “mart” names conjured up images of corner stores and cheap outlets.

They decided to keep the color blue, which Mathews said is the world’s favorite color, but go for a brighter hue they believed evoked modernity and trustworthiness. They replaced the sharp angles of the original letters with “a more humanistic font.” Finally, they decided on an asterisk-like symbol they wanted to look like “a lightbulb going off in your head,” a metaphor for Wal-Mart shoppers being smart for taking advantage of affordable, quality products. They chose a hue of yellow that appeared hopeful but didn’t make it too bright because “bright yellow is associated with low-cost items in retail,” said Mathews. She was happy to find that focus groups also interpreted the spark as a sun or flower, both positive associations.

eBay

In 2012, eBay basically had the inverse problem from Wal-Mart: It wanted to finally grow up, and its playful logo was getting in the way of its ambition. Mathews said that when Internet companies have electric, jumbled logos, they conjure up memories of the companies that died when the dot-com bubble burst. So, for eBay, she and her team stuck close to the original design but refined the typography, toned down the colors, and put the letters on the same baseline. The resulting logo is “more grounded” and better suited for a company that takes business seriously.

Hyatt Place

Hyatt Hotels Corporation bought AmeriSuites in 2004, and Lippincott was responsible for rebranding the chain as Hyatt Place, which launched in 2006. Hyatt and the designers believed that AmeriSuite’s affordable business-suite market was beginning to be seen as boring, cheap alternatives to upscale hotels, and that the way to turn it around would be to turn it into the option for younger business travelers who may not be very wealthy but still appreciate luxury.

A fundamental component of the relaunch was to give every Hyatt Place an attractive, engaging lobby. The final logo combined two different shapes: In design, said Mathews, “a circle tends to be seen as modern and approachable” and “a square tends to be steadfast and disciplined.” The design team chose vibrant colors for seven of the circles and picked black for two. When Hyatt Place signs are illuminated at night, the colored circles create an “H” for “Hyatt,” which Mathews finds to be a fun, extra dimension of the logo.

Starbucks

Over the past several years, Starbucks has grown into a global powerhouse and has been heavily promoting its non-coffee products, like pastries, sandwiches, and teas. In 2011, it decided it wanted a simpler logo not tied to the word “coffee.” Mathews was not involved in the project, but her Lippincott colleagues were.

The redesign started with a basic premise. When focus groups were asked what color Starbucks’ logo was, explained Mathews, participants almost universally said “green.” But the thing is, only the ring around the former logo was green — the siren character was outlined in black. Mathews said the designers freed the siren from her constraints and imbued her with the color with which customers were already associating the brand. They nixed the word “coffee” and brought the text outside of the circle, since the siren had become iconic enough to stand on her own.

“It’s a great example of how a logo can evolve,” said Mathews.

NBC

Lippincott has not worked with NBC, but Mathews said the NBC peacock is one of her favorite logos. She thinks the logo has improved over time as it’s gotten simpler, and that even though the peacock’s colors originally celebrated the advent of color television, the array of colors still transmits feelings of joy and energy.

FedEx

FedEx’s logo is another one of Mathew’s favorites. As shown by her work with the Hyatt Place logo, she likes images that have surprises in them, and the arrow formed by the “E” and “x” in FedEx is one of the best-known hidden designs. She also appreciates the timeless nature of the logo. “It could have be designed in 1970 or it could have been designed yesterday,” she said.

It was actually created in 1994 by Lindon Leader, and it has won more than 40 design awards, partially for the reasons Mathews mentioned.

Apple

Mathews thinks that Apple’s logo is a perfect example of how a logo needs to adapt to the changing direction of the company it represents. One of Apple’s co-founders, Ronald Wayne, designed the first Apple logo, a weird, detailed etching of Sir Isaac Newton that was supposed to represent the way Apple was an ambitious outsider. That same year, Steve Jobs hired Rob Janoff to replace it with something more modern. Janoff came up with the now iconic image of an apple with a bite out of it, and Jobs decided Apple’s unique approach to computers would be represented by making it rainbow-colored.

It became monochrome in 1998 to fit into the clean, simplistic designs that the company decided to pursue.

Regarding trends and presentation

When tackling a branding project, Mathews differentiates between the “true and new.” She say a logo needs to be “true,” in the sense that it should not be fundamentally tied to a trend, the “new.” The trendiness is more appropriate in supporting elements of branding, like store experiences or website interfaces. That said, a logo should be fundamentally sound but also be adaptable to the ways it will be presented.

“Logos used to have to be recognizable down to the size that they would be represented on a business card. Now they have to work at much smaller sizes, because they’ll be seen on mobile screens,” Mathews said. That’s actually the reason why so many logos have become “flatter,” in the sense that they’ve been stripped of techniques like shadowing that add a dimension of depth or movement.

Here’s an example of how Google went flat last year:

“I personally like more simple designs,” said Mathews. “Gradients are my worst nightmare.”

This story originally appeared on Business Insider

4 Reasons Why Recruiters Don’t Call You

Updates

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Looking for a job is a full-time job. It’s time-consuming and often frustrating. You can spend hours, days, or even weeks searching for a job that’s just the right fit. Then one day you find the “perfect” job. You fire off your resume. And you never hear a word. There are numerous reasons you don’t even get contacted for an interview. Some reasons are in your control, like triple-checking your resume for typos, but others are not.

These are four common reasons why recruiters don’t call you.

 

You’re not qualified

Every day recruiters get resumes from people who are not even remotely qualified for the position for which they’re applying. While you don’t need to meet every single requirement to apply you should have a substantial amount. If you don’t have most, if not all, of the “must haves” or “requirements” it’s unlikely you’ll get a call. No matter how much of a “quick learner” you may be if the employer is asking for five years of experience they won’t be hiring a recent grad. Even one with a few internships under his or her belt. When an ad reads “SEO Manager” search engine optimization should appear on your resume.

Your salary is too high (or too low)

Jobs have a salary range and if your salary is way too high the recruiter is not going to call you. No matter how awesome you may be it’s highly unlikely they’re going to pay you $140K if the top of their range is $100K. On the flip side if your salary is too low they may think you’re under qualified. While the reason may be that you’re undervaluing yourself you may not get a call. It may not happen as often but it does happen. To help prevent these issues do your research with industry publications and salary calculators. Consider your financial situation and decide on your bottom line. You don’t want to price yourself out of the game.

Your social media profile doesn’t match your resume

After a recruiter reads your resume you can bet he or she will look you up online. When you’re looking for a job consistency is essential. If your LinkedIn profile doesn’t line up with your resume the recruiter is, at the least, going to wonder why. Many recruiters will also look at your Twitter feed or Facebook page so think before you post. A picture of you having a glass of wine on your birthday shouldn’t be a problem, but constant negativity, like ranting about your boss and/or colleagues, can hurt your chances of being hired.

They’re already pursuing someone else

Unfortunately, sometimes it’s a case of bad timing. While the job may not be filled yet they may have collected several promising resumes or the hiring manager may already be down to a few strong candidates. If you apply for a position once they are well into the hiring process you may just be too late. This is one of the prime reasons it pays to network – it can help you find out about jobs before they are posted.

Whether you’re out of work or currently employed it’s not easy to find a new job. If it were no one would be unemployed or stay in a job they hate, ever. When it comes to finding a new position do your best with everything that’s under your control, like preventing resume typos, and try not to obsess about the rest, like if they already have a front-runner. Remember you can’t lose a job you didn’t have in the first place.

My Worst Nightmare: Being A Nobody At 30

Updates

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Can I tell you something personal? I’m one of those people who looks at the date today and how old I am now before I calculate how old I will be in 5 year’s time. Then I take stock of my achievements and failures to date and set myself that impossible goal to reach by that time. I don’t think I’m alone, but I do feel a bit embarrassed to admit to this habit.

It’s like counting the number of hours of sleep I’ll get if I sleep “right now”, as if quantifying it will improve the quality of sleep. It’s silly really, but humans are pretty silly creatures. We know it won’t make a difference, but it doesn’t stop us doing it. We know deep down that by doing this counting, we’re actually eating into the time that we should be spending to hit our goal, whether it be number of hours of sleep or taking over the world.

Our world is overrun with numbers. Some occupations will hold you hard-line accountable against these numbers “or else” (read sales). It’s no wonder that we’re obsessed with them. Don’t get me wrong, there’s nothing bad about quantifying goals, but there’s obviously a right and wrong way to do it. Putting hard numbers next to a goal will turn it into a measurable target, a key tenant of the SMART goals strategy.

You Can’t Control Everything

But as I read in a negotiating book recently, there’s trying to quantify goals that you can control and goals that you can’t. In this book, the author takes a stance against traditional sales jobs that require you to meet KPIs and targets. It puts pressure onto you as the salesperson, makes you appear unnatural, introduces pressure into a sales conversation and makes for a generally unhappy experience for all.

He argues that it makes more sense to quantify what you can control, i.e. in this case for sales, it would be number of calls per hour, but even then, that isn’t as effective. It’s about looking into yourself and managing your expectations of who you are and where you’re at on your path.

There’s No “Real” Deadline

Deadlines can be good if you have to finish a specific task by a certain date. However, when it comes to personal goals, more often than not, there is no “real” deadline. It’s just the ones that you impose upon yourself.

I always aimed big. At 18, I wanted to have this and that before I was 25. Now that I’m going on 25 this year with nothing that I wanted, it allowed me to be introspective and think about what happened and why I wasn’t successful in my eyes.

I needed a better concept of time and success and to stop being distracted by outliers. There were always going to be those who sparked and exploded onto the scene, but the majority of success stories burned buckets of midnight oil.

the majority of success stories burned buckets of midnight oil.

My problem was that I wasn’t consistent. Like a hopeless moth, fluttering erratically from lamp to light to fire, I didn’t dedicate myself to something for more than a few months.

The other thing was that I didn’t fall in love with boredom. This was a great idea that I read about. I can’t remember the source, but the concept has stuck with me since I first lay my eyes on it.

All the legends in their respective fields, whether it be Kobe Bryant in basketball, Tiger Woods in golf or Ernest Hemingway in writing, did the same things over and over to build up their muscle memory. They turned the simplest of actions into a transcendental extension of their superiority in their field.

I’m not going to lie. I’ll still be disappointed in myself if I’m not who I want to be by the time I’m 30. However, now I know that the path to getting there is only through hard work, discipline, persistence and dedication.

Image by Eric Pouhier

Johnson Kee is a direct-response copywriter and marketing strategist based in Melbourne, Australia.